News

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  • 18 Dec 2014 2:16 PM | Samantha Coffman (Administrator)
    The U.S. Congress succeeded in passing four land protection billsundefinedwhich will be signed into lawundefinedthat we can feel good about, thanks in part to IMBA and its local supporting organizations working to ensure that popular trails remained open to bikes. One of the bills even moves a 1964 Wilderness boundary to accommodate mountain bike access on high alpine, backcountry singletrack in New Mexico. Read more about the legislation and areas it affects.


  • 18 Dec 2014 9:03 AM | Samantha Coffman (Administrator)
    The Arizona Trail Association's Seeds of Stewardship program encourages youth participation in the Arizona Trail through a three-tiered approach: experience, education, and service learning. The objective is to inspire the next generation to take an active role in the enjoyment, development, and protection of the Arizona National Scenic Trail, as well as other parks, trails, and public lands throughout the state. The Arizona Trail Junior Explorer Handbook is now available online. The Bureau of Land Management created and printed the handbook, and funds for printing the first 36,000 copies were provided by the National Park Service and the USDA Forest Service. The guide provides environmental education materials for Arizona Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Boys and Girls Clubs, Audubon Arizona, Desert Botanical Garden, several zoos, and junior high school teachers statewide who are and will be involved in this program as well.  Download the 20-page handbook...


  • 18 Dec 2014 9:02 AM | Samantha Coffman (Administrator)
    The promotion of cycling and walking for everyday physical activity not only promotes health but can also have positive effects on the environment. The World Health Organization has updated tools and guidance for the economic assessment of transport infrastructure and policies in relation to the health effects of walking and cycling. It also includes reviews of the economic and health literature.  Download the 39-page publication (2.5 mb)...


  • 18 Dec 2014 8:58 AM | Samantha Coffman (Administrator)

    The Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) Recreational Trails Program (RTP) Database serves as a central repository for RTP data for the use of policy makers, administrators, project managers, and the general public, as well as the FHWA. It currently includes over 21,000 projects, can be searched by multiple categories, and displays individual project information. The Image Library includes photos from all 50 States and DC highlighting RTP-funded projects. The RTP Database and the Image Library can be found at www.recreationaltrailsinfo.org.

  • 16 Dec 2014 10:26 AM | Samantha Coffman (Administrator)

    The 2015 APRA conference and expo will take place August 10-13 in Oro Valley.  To help us develop an exciting and motivating program, we invite attendees to submit ideas for presentations in support of this years theme, "PRx: Doctor's Orders." Proposals can be submitted for education sessions, 1-day workshops and general session. Click here for form

  • 08 Dec 2014 10:19 AM | Samantha Coffman (Administrator)

    Our View: Creative approaches get Arizonans into natural treasures and raise money to support state parks. Read full article...

  • 03 Dec 2014 11:26 AM | Samantha Coffman (Administrator)
    Turns out quite a lot! In your park and recreation department GIS data can be used in developing your park’s master plan, facilitating long-range planning, building your park and facility maintenance programs and much more. But you have to learn how to put all of that great data into action and understand the value and power of GIS. Tune in on December 4 at 2 p.m. ET for a free webinar presented by Virginia’s Fairfax County Park Authority and NRPA’s GIS team to learn more about GIS and how you can successfully work with this type of data and information to benefit your agency.
    Click here for more information about the free webinar.


  • 03 Dec 2014 11:25 AM | Samantha Coffman (Administrator)
    Show your skills are current. Demonstrate your commitment to parks and recreation. Prove the value you bring to your agency. These are great ways to unwrap your professional potential and take your career further. You can do them all when you become a Certified Park and Recreation Professional (CPRP). Add "save money" to the list too, because right now when you apply for CPRP before February 28, 2015, you’ll get a free CPRP prep course (a $100 value).
    Click here to find out more and take advantage of the limited time savings.


  • 25 Nov 2014 1:38 PM | Samantha Coffman (Administrator)

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a health impact assessment toolkit that will help community stakeholders such as park and recreation departments, city planners and public health departments work together to create healthier environments through parks and trails. According to the CDC, “this tool focuses on how parks and trails can contribute to public health by highlighting key issues such as lack of access to parks and trails and encouraging physical activity.” The toolkit has six components and includes data resources, recommendations from impact assessments and citations to support the recommendations.

    Click here for more information and to access the toolkit. 

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a health impact assessment toolkit that will help community stakeholders such as park and recreation departments, city planners and public health departments work together to create healthier environments through parks and trails. According to the CDC, “this tool focuses on how parks and trails can contribute to public health by highlighting key issues such as lack of access to parks and trails and encouraging physical activity.” The toolkit has six components and includes data resources, recommendations from impact assessments and citations to support the recommendations.

    Click here for more information and to access the toolkit. 

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a health impact assessment toolkit that will help community stakeholders such as park and recreation departments, city planners and public health departments work together to create healthier environments through parks and trails. According to the CDC, “this tool focuses on how parks and trails can contribute to public health by highlighting key issues such as lack of access to parks and trails and encouraging physical activity.” The toolkit has six components and includes data resources, recommendations from impact assessments and citations to support the recommendations.

    Click here for more information and to access the toolkit. 

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a health impact assessment toolkit that will help community stakeholders such as park and recreation departments, city planners and public health departments work together to create healthier environments through parks and trails. According to the CDC, “this tool focuses on how parks and trails can contribute to public health by highlighting key issues such as lack of access to parks and trails and encouraging physical activity.” The toolkit has six components and includes data resources, recommendations from impact assessments and citations to support the recommendations.

    Click here for more information and to access the toolkit. 

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a health impact assessment toolkit that will help community stakeholders such as park and recreation departments, city planners and public health departments work together to create healthier environments through parks and trails. According to the CDC, “this tool focuses on how parks and trails can contribute to public health by highlighting key issues such as lack of access to parks and trails and encouraging physical activity.” The toolkit has six components and includes data resources, recommendations from impact assessments and citations to support the recommendations.

    Click here for more information and to access the toolkit. 
  • 25 Nov 2014 1:36 PM | Samantha Coffman (Administrator)

    Facebook is a powerful social marketing tool for park and recreation departments. Yet, recent daunting headlines in the news about changes to the platform and the push for more advertising may have you scratching your head. The changes are likely to affect how you use Facebook to engage with the community, but don’t panic. We’ve outlined what you need to know and identified four ways you can adapt to the new changes.

    Click here to read “How Facebook Changes Affect Parks and Rec (and Four Ways to Adapt).”


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